Prince Marko and the Vila

Prince Marko and the Vila

Heroic Ballads of Serbia

translated by

George Rapall Noyes & Leonard Bacon

Two sworn brothers were riding over Miroch, the mountain fair;
Voývoda Milosh and Marko were the two heroes there.
Side by side the steeds did they ride as they bore the spears that day;
One kissed the face of the other: such loving brothers were they.
Then Marko on Dapple yearned to sleep; he spake to his brother sworn:
“Voývoda Milosh, heavily by sleep am I overborne.
Sing to me, brother, and cheer me.”
“Prince Marko, brother mine,”
Said Milosh, “I would sing to thee, but, Marko, I drank the wine
In the mountain with Ravíyoyla, the vila, yesternight.
She forbade me; if she hears me, my throat and heart will she smite.”
Prince Marko spake: “Sing brother, nor ever the vila fear,
While Dapple and I and the war-club with six gold knobs are here.”
Then sang Milosh, the voývoda, a great and beautiful song
Of our elders and our betters that held the kingdom long

Urosh and the Sons of Marnyáva

Urosh and the Sons of Marnyáva

Heroic Ballads of Serbia

translated by

George Rapall Noyes & Leonard Bacon

In the fair field of Kósovo were four pavilions pight
By the fair church of Kósovo, Samódrezha the white.
Vukáshin lay in one fair tent, and Lord Úglyesha was nigh;
Goyko the duke and Urosh, the tsar’s son, lay thereby.
The tsars rob one another of the empire of the tsars,
And they yearn to slay each other with the gilded scimitars.
They know not whose is the empire. “It is mine,” Vukáshin saith,
But the great Lord Úglyesha answers: “It is mine, upon my faith.”
And Goyko, the proud voývoda, saith likewise: “It is mine”;
But the son of the tsar, Prince Urosh, in silence must he pine,
For he dares not break his silence before those angry ones,
Before the three great brothers, Marnyáva’s mighty sons.
 Vukáshin writeth a letter, and a herald doth he send,
To Nédelko, the archpriest, in the city of Prizrend;
And he bids him come to Kósovo, that he may there decide